Creative Writing

News

Creative Writing Majors Published in New Anthology

Posted: August 26, 2014

UE creative writing majors Jane Friedman ‘98, Johanna Gohmann ’98, and Jessica Russell-Pope ’13, have all had essays included in a new anthology, Every Father’s Daughter, to be published in the spring of 2015 by McPherson & Company, New York.

UE Professor of Creative Writing Margaret McMullan and Columbia University Professor Phillip Lopate edited and wrote introductions for Every Father’s Daughter, a collection of personal essays about fathers written by contemporary women writers such as Nobel laureate Alice Munro and Pulitzer Prize winner Jane Smiley. Other contributors include Joyce Maynard, Ann Hood, Lee Smith, Jill McCorkle, Antonya Nelson, Bobbie Ann Mason, Jayne Anne Phillips, Alexandra Styron, and Maxine Hong Kingston.

UE creative writing major Jessica Russell-Pope ’13 also served as copyeditor for the manuscript during her senior year Independent Study with Professor McMullan.

Professor McMullan and Professor Lopate taught together in 1993, when Professor Lopate came to UE as a visiting writer. Professor Lopate currently directs the MFA program in Creative Nonfiction at Columbia University in New York. Professor McMullan is the Melvin M. Peterson Endowed Chair in Literature and Writing.

In April, Professors McMullan and Lopate will host a panel event at the AWP in Minneapolis, MN with readings from anthology contributors Joyce Maynard, Ann Hood, Jayne Anne Phillips and Jill McCorkle.

UE Coffee Hour Reading to Feature Paul Bone

Posted: November 4, 2013

On Thursday, November 7, the University of Evansville’s Department of Creative Writing will feature department chair Paul Bone in its Coffee Hour series, which hosts celebrated writers for afternoon readings of their published works.

Each Coffee Hour begins at 4 p.m. in the Melvin Peterson Gallery at the corner of Lincoln and Weinbach avenues. Coffee and cookies will be served, and the authors will be available afterward for conversation and book signings. Coffee Hours are free and open to the public.

Bone is the author of the poetry collections Momentary Vision of the Assistant Meteorologist (Uccelli Press), which won the 2004 Uccelli Prize, and Nostalgia for Sacrifice (David Robert Books). His poems, reviews, creative nonfiction, and radio essays have been published in 32 Poems, The Cream City Review, The Cimarron Review, The Iron Horse Literary Review, The Evansville Review, Tupelo Press, and National Public Radio.

Bone earned a Bachelor of Arts from Southern Illinois University Carbondale. After completing a Master of Fine Arts at the University of Arkansas, he taught English in Tokyo, Japan. Bone currently serves as chair of UE’s Department of Creative Writing and is one of the founding co-editors of Measure: A Review of Formal Poetry.

UE Welcomes Renowned Writer Joyce Carol Oates for Two-Day Symposium

Posted: April 12, 2013

The University of Evansville’s Department of Creative Writing, with generous support from the Efroymson Family Fund, will host a two-day symposium on April 19-20 dedicated to the life and work of world-renowned author Joyce Carol Oates.

The symposium includes the following events, all of which are free and open to the public:

  • A reading by Joyce Carol Oates at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 19 in Eykamp Hall (Ridgway University Center), followed by a book signing and reception
  • A question-and-answer session with Joyce Carol Oates at 9 a.m. Saturday, April 20 in Shanklin Theatre
  • A writers’ panel on Joyce Carol Oates at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, April 20 in Smythe Lecture Hall (Room 170, Schroeder School of Business Building), featuring writers Pinckney Benedict, Laura Benedict, Laurence Goldstein, and Margaret McMullan
  • A young writers’ panel on Joyce Carol Oates at 7:45 a.m. Saturday, April 20 in Smythe Lecture Hall (Room 170, Schroeder School of Business Building), featuring four UE creative writing students
  • A screening of the film “We Were the Mulvaneys” at 1 p.m. Saturday, April 20 in Cokes Lecture Hall (Room 126, Hyde Hall). The film is based on the novel by Joyce Carol Oates and stars Beau Bridges and Blythe Danner.

In April 2012, the Department of Creative Writing received a $10,000 grant from the Efroymson Family Fund to help fund the Joyce Carol Oates Symposium, which follows the tradition of the successful Arthur Miller Symposium that took place at UE in 1998.

“The Arthur Miller Symposium showed us that an artistic event of this caliber has the power to make a lasting impact on UE students, faculty, and the community at large,” said William Baer, UE professor of creative writing. “A visit by Joyce Carol Oates, made possible by the Efroymson Family Fund, will be a significant event in the history of UE, and an extraordinary opportunity to raise awareness of the critical importance of the arts in our lives.”

Oates is one of the world’s most distinguished writers, having been nominated three times for the Nobel Prize. Born in upstate New York in 1938, Oates earned her Bachelor of Arts from Syracuse University in 1960 and her Master of Arts from the University of Wisconsin in 1961. She is currently the Roger S. Berlind Distinguished Professor of the Humanities at Princeton University.

Her literary accomplishments have been recognized by numerous awards, including the Fairfax Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Literary Arts, the PEN/Malamud Award for Excellence in short fiction, the Rosenthal Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and the O’Henry Prize for Continued Achievement in the Short Story. In 2010 she was awarded the National Humanities Medal by President Barack Obama.

The symposium falls on the 50th anniversary of Oates’ first published book, By the North Gate (1963), a collection of short stories. Since then, Oates has published over 80 books in numerous genres: novels, short story collections, poetry, plays, literary criticism, children’s books, mystery and horror novels, various anthologies, and even a book-length essay entitled On Boxing. Her works of fiction include: Them, winner of the National Book Award; Black Water, nominated for the Pulitzer Prize; Zombie, recipient of the Bram Stoker Award; What I Lived For, nominated for the PEN/Faulkner Award; Blonde, nominated for the Pulitzer Prize; You Must Remember This, praised as “an American masterpiece” by James Atlas; The Falls, recipient of France’s prestigious Prix Femina; We Were The Mulvaneys, selected as an Oprah Book of the Month and subsequently made into a movie starring Beau Bridges and Blythe Danner; and the New York Times bestseller The Gravedigger’s Daughter.

The University of Evansville wishes to thank the Efroymson Family Fund, a fund of the Central Indiana Community Foundation, for its support of the arts at UE. Since the fund was established in 1998, it has awarded more than $70 million to nonprofit organizations in central Indiana and beyond. For more information on the Efroymson Family Fund, please visit www.cicf.org/efroymson-family-fund.

Creative Writing Coffee Hour Welcomes George Singleton

Posted: September 18, 2012

On Thursday, September 20, the University of Evansville’s Department of Creative Writing will feature fiction writer and teacher George Singleton in its Coffee Hour series, which brings celebrated writers to campus for afternoon readings of their published works.

Each Coffee Hour begins at 4:00 p.m. in the Melvin Peterson Gallery at the corner of Lincoln and Weinbach avenues. Coffee and cookies will be served, and the authors will be available afterward for conversation and book signings. Coffee Hours are free and open to the public.

George Singleton is the author of five collections of short stories: These People Are Us, The Half-Mammals of Dixie, Why Dogs Chase Cars, Drowning in Gruel, and Stray Decorum. He has also published two novels, Novel and Work Shirts for Madmen, and a book of writing advice titled Pep Talks, Warnings, and Screeds. He has published more than 150 short stories in magazines and journals such as Atlantic Monthly, Harper's, Zoetrope Georgia Review, Southern Review, Epoch, Oxford American, and Kenyon Review.

A past Guggenheim Fellowship recipient, Singleton has also received the Hillsdale Award from the Fellowship of Southern Writers. He teaches fiction writing at the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities in Greenville, South Carolina.

For more information on the Coffee Hour series, please visit the Department of Creative Writing's website.