History

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Fiddick Lecture to Discuss “Changing Views of Islam”

Posted: October 3, 2013

The University of Evansville’s Department of History is proud to welcome Olivia Remie Constable, professor of medieval history and the Robert M. Conway Director of the Medieval Institute at the University of Notre Dame, for the annual Thomas C. Fiddick Memorial Lecture.

Constable will present “Changing Views of Islam in Spain Between the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period” at 7 p.m. Friday, November 1, in Eykamp Hall (Room 252, Ridgway University Center). Her lecture is free and open to the public.

“Olivia Remie Constable is one of the most distinguished medieval historians working in America today, and we are absolutely thrilled to bring her to the University of Evansville to deliver the Fiddick Lecture and interact with students in class,” said James MacLeod, UE professor of history and director of the Fiddick Memorial Lecture. “As the Western world struggles with its problematic relationship with Islam, and as tensions between the two continue to rise, it is the perfect time for our community to hear from one of the world’s foremost authorities on the relationship between the West and Islam.”

Constable holds a PhD in Near Eastern studies from Princeton University and has taught at the University of Notre Dame since 1995. Her publications include Trade and Traders in Muslim Spain: The Commercial Realignment of the Iberian Peninsula 900-1500 (Cambridge University Press, 1994), which won the John Nicholas Brown Prize from the Medieval Academy of America; Medieval Iberia: Readings from Christian, Muslim, and Jewish Sources (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1997; second edition 2011); and Housing the Stranger in the Mediterranean World: Lodging, Trade, and Travel in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages (Cambridge University Press, 2003). She is currently working on a new book examining Christian perceptions of Muslim identity in late medieval and early modern Spain.

Constable has been a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the Guggenheim Foundation, and was named a fellow of the Medieval Academy of America in 2009.

Thomas Fiddick, for whom the Fiddick Memorial Lecture is named, served as professor of history at the University of Evansville from 1963 to 2002. In his 39 years at the University, he was a dedicated teacher, a productive scholar, and a tireless fighter in the cause of justice. His untimely death on the day of his retirement in 2002 stunned the entire UE community, especially his many former students. It was from the former students’ efforts in particular, with the support of Fiddick’s friends and the University, that the annual Thomas C. Fiddick Memorial Lecture was established.

“The Fiddick Lecture is one of the best events of the year, as we get to celebrate the career of a truly outstanding faculty member here at UE,” MacLeod added. “Tom Fiddick was a brilliant scholar and an incredible teacher who made a life-transforming impact on generations of students.”

For more information, please contact the Department of History at 812-488-2963.

History Professor Publishes New Article

Posted: August 22, 2013

Dr Robin Sager has a new article out.

Warm congratulations to Dr Robin Sager, of the UE Department of History, who has published another scholarly article, “Waco’s Women in War Time,” in Waco History and Heritage 39:1. Feel free to ask her anytime about Waco's Women in War time!

Speaker Announced for 12th Fiddick Lecture

Posted: August 20, 2013

Notre Dame Professor to speak at UE on November 1st at 7pm

The Department of History is delighted to announce that the 12th annual Thomas C. Fiddick Memorial Lecture will be at 7pm on Friday November 1, 2013 in the Ridgway University Center. The speaker will be Olivia Remie Constable, professor of medieval history and the Robert M. Conway director of the Medieval Institute at the University of Notre Dame. She will speak on “Changing views of Islam in Spain between the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period". This event is free and open to the public.

History Professor Interviewed on Egypt

Posted: August 16, 2013

UE History Professor Dan Byrne talks to WEHT about the ongoing crisis in Egypt

Watch here, as UE History Professor Dan Byrne talks to WEHT news anchor Brad Byrd about the ongoing crisis in Egypt. At the end, Brad Byrd delivers a passionate statement about how essential the knowledge of History is for us as a society.

Harlaxton Professor to Speak at UE, March 21 2013

Posted: February 21, 2013

Dr David Green of Harlaxton College will be delivering the annual History Department Spring Lecture, March 21.

The History Department is delighted to announce that  on March 21st, from 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm in
Ridgway 251A, Dr David Green of Harlaxton College will present a lecture entitled  “The English Empire in the Later Middle Ages”. This is the annual History Department Spring Lecture, and is free and open to the public. "We are absolutely delighted to have David Green as our Spring Lecturer," said Dr James MacLeod,  Interim Chair of the History Department. "He has already written three books and numerous articles on the Middle Ages, and his research interests reveal a brilliant mind. He is also a tremendous public speaker, so we are all in for a treat."

James MacLeod to Present November Andiron Lecture

Posted: October 30, 2012

Next week, as part of the University of Evansville’s Andiron Lecture Series in the liberal arts and sciences, James MacLeod, professor of history, will present “To the Greater Glory of God: Religion and Memorialization in 1920s Scotland.”

MacLeod will speak at 4 p.m. Wednesday, November 7 in Eykamp Hall (Room 252), Ridgway University Center. His lecture is free and open to the public.

“The First World War killed around 10 million men and helped shape the modern world,” MacLeod said. “The war had a devastating impact on traditional religious belief, especially in formerly pious countries like Scotland.”

“Through an analysis of around one thousand Scottish war memorials, mostly erected in the early 1920s, this lecture is a measurement of the extent to which religion continued to be a force in society. This involves a discussion of not only location and form, but also iconography and inscriptions, and is one way to assess the real impact war had on traditional religion in Scotland.”

MacLeod holds a PhD from the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. He taught history and British studies at Harlaxton College from 1994-99, and since 1999 he has taught history at the University of Evansville. In 2003, he was honored with the Exemplary Teacher Award, presented by the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry of The United Methodist Church. He is the author of The Second Disruption: The Free Church in Victorian Scotland and the Origins of the Free Presbyterian Church (Tuckwell Press, 2000) and numerous articles and chapters of books. His research interests are war, war memorials, and religion. His grandfather was a stretcher bearer in World War I.

Established in 1982, the Andiron Lectures offer research, commentary, and reflection from many fields of study. Presenters are primarily drawn from the faculty of UE’s College of Arts and Sciences but also include faculty members and administrators from across the University campus and occasional contributions from the regional community. The Andiron Lectures are sponsored by the University of Evansville College of Arts and Sciences and supported by a generous gift from Donald B. and Jean Korb.

For a full schedule of 2012-13 Andiron Lectures, please visit the series website.

For more information, please contact series coordinator M. Christine Mohn at 812-488-2585 or the College of Arts and Sciences at 812-488-2589.

Fiddick Memorial Lecture to Discuss "Lincoln and the Navy in the Civil War"

Posted: October 8, 2012

The University of Evansville’s Department of History is pleased to welcome Craig L. Symonds, PhD, for the annual Thomas C. Fiddick Memorial Lecture.

Symonds, professor emeritus of history at the United States Naval Academy, will present “Lincoln and the Navy in the Civil War” at 7 p.m. Friday, October 26 in Eykamp Hall, Room 251A. His lecture is free and open to the public.

“We are very excited to have Craig Symonds coming, as he is undoubtedly the world’s leading expert on Abraham Lincoln and the Navy in the Civil War,” said James MacLeod, UE professor of history and director of the Thomas C. Fiddick Memorial Lecture. “As 150th anniversary commemorations continue, this is a wonderful opportunity for people in the Tri-State to hear one of the Naval Academy’s most distinguished professors speaking on a topic that he knows so much about. People are always fascinated by Lincoln, but Lincoln’s role as commander-in-chief, especially as commander of the Navy, is one that most people don’t know much about. They will be captivated by Professor Symonds’ lecture.”

Symonds is the first person to win both the Naval Academy’s Excellence in Teaching award (1988) and its Excellence in Research award (1998). He also served as history department chair from 1988 to 1992, and received the Department of the Navy’s Superior Civilian Service medal three times. After retiring in 2005, he returned to the Academy in 2011-12 to serve a year as the Class of 1957 Distinguished Chair of American Naval History.

Symonds is the author or editor of 25 books, including prize-winning biographies of Joseph E. Johnston (1992), Patrick Cleburne (1997), and Franklin Buchanan (1999), as well as The American Heritage History of the Battle of Gettysburg (2001). Decision at Sea: Five Naval Battles that Shaped American History (2006) won the Theodore and Franklin D. Roosevelt Prize for Naval History the year it was published. His 2008 book, Lincoln and His Admirals: Abraham Lincoln, the U.S. Navy, and the Civil War, won the Barondess Prize, the Laney Prize, the Lyman Prize, the Lincoln Prize, and the Abraham Lincoln Institute Book Award. Symonds also won the Nevins-Freeman Prize in 2009. His latest work is The Battle of Midway, published by Oxford University Press in October 2011. He lives in Annapolis, Maryland.

Thomas Fiddick, for whom the Fiddick Memorial Lecture is named, served as professor of history at the University of Evansville from 1963 to 2002. In the 39 years he spent at the University, he was a dedicated teacher, a productive scholar, and a tireless fighter in the cause of justice. His untimely death on the day of his retirement in 2002 stunned the entire University of Evansville community, especially his many former students. It was from the former students’ efforts in particular, with the support of Fiddick’s friends and the University, that the annual Thomas C. Fiddick Memorial Lecture was established.