Physical Therapy

Course Offerings

Physical Therapy Assistant Courses (PTA)

PT–100 Medical Terminology (1 credit)
Utilizes guided independent student learning activities to teach the basic prefixes, suffixes, and roots of medical terms. Assists student in utilizing medical terminology appropriately in both written and verbal forms. Fall, spring.
PT–101 Basic Modalities & Techniques for PTA I (3 credits)
Includes basic procedures fundamental to physical therapy: safe body mechanics, patient handling, positioning, and transfers. Instruction includes the principles and techniques of massage. Students explore the principles and physiologic responses of the following physical agents: heat, cold, water, light, electrical stimulation, mechanical traction, intermittent compression, and pressure garments, as well as indications and contraindications to the use of these modalities. Students also learn appropriate communication between a PT and PTA with regard to the use of these agents. Students experience and demonstrate application of each physical agent in a laboratory setting.Course includes introduction to documentation. Lecture/lab. Fall. Prerequisite: admission to PTA program.
PT–101L Basic Modalities & Techniques I Lab
Includes basic procedures fundamental to physical therapy: safe body mechanics, patient handling, positioning, and transfers. Instruction in the principles and techniques of massage. Students explore the principles and physiologic responses of the following physical agents: heat, cold, water, light, electrical stimulation, mechanical traction, intermittent compression, and pressure garments, as well as indications and contraindications to the use of these modalities. Students also learn appropriate communication skills between a PT and PTA with regard to the use of these agents. Students experience and demonstrate application of each physical agent in a laboratory setting. Introduction to documentation. Lecture/lab. Fall.
PT–102 Basic Modalities&Techniques PTA II (4 credits)
Emphasizes management of musculoskeletal dysfunctions. Builds on first semester techniques and integrates these with exercise in the treatment of orthopedic-based impairments. Units include stress management, mobility training, principles of therapeutic exercise, and the effects of exercise on body systems. Students learn various modes of exercise, extremity proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation patterns, EMG biofeedback, and tissue ealing. This course includes management of orthopaedic conditions including pathology, exercise prescription and progression, and the use of exercise equipment. Other topics include industrial medicine and the effect of aging on body systems. Assignments reinforce appropriate communication between the PT and PTA and documentation. Lecture/lab. Prerequisites: Exercise and Sport Science 112, Physical Therapy 101. Corequisite: Exercise and Sport Science 113 if not already taken. Spring.
PT–102L Basic Modalities&Techniques II Lab
Emphasizes management of musculoskeletal dysfunctions. Builds on first semester techniques and integrates these with exercise in the treatment of orthopedic-based impairments. Units include stress management, mobility training, principles of therapeutic exercise, and the effects of exercise on body systems. Students learn various modes of exercise, extremity proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation patterns, EMG biofeedback, and tissue ealing. This course includes management of orthopaedic conditions including pathology, exercise prescription and progression, and the use of exercise equipment. Other topics include industrial medicine and the effect of aging on body systems. Assignments reinforce appropriate communication between the PT and PTA and documentation. Lecture/lab. Prerequisites: Exercise and Sport Science 112, Physical Therapy 101. Corequisite: Exercise and Sport Science 113 if not already taken. Spring.
PT–103 Fundamentals of Client Care (3 credits)
Introduction to physical therapy. Emphasizes the role of the physical therapist assistant, professional core values, professional development, and ethical/legal issues. Introduction to basic concepts of cultural competence and professional communication. Includes principles of infection control, vital signs, and wound management. Prerequisite: Admission to PTA program. Fall.
PT–106 Functional Anatomy Lab (2 credits)
Introduces skills of goniometry and manual muscle testing. Includes gross assessment of posture and gait. Prerequisite: Exercise and Sport Science 112. Corequisites: Exercise and Sport Science 113 if not already taken; Interdisciplinary 356 if not already taken. Spring.
PT–110 Field Experience for PTA (1 credit)
Introduces physical therapy through observations at clinical facilities and by reading appropriate articles. Student accompanies a physical therapist or physical therapist assistant at a facility to develop an understanding of the various roles and duties of the personnel and an appreciation of the variety of patients and their interventions. Student may assist in simple procedures as selected by the clinical supervisor and has opportunity to improve communication skills. Provides introduction to other health care professionals and to the role of the administrator of physical therapy services. Prerequisite: Admission to the PTA program. Spring.
PT–111 Clinical I (4 credits)
Introduction to clinical facilities as an active participant in the health care team. Orientation to clinical setting and procedures provided by the clinical instructor. Students use basic physical therapy procedures, administer modalities, as well as carry out basic exercise programs and gait training. All treatment supervised by a physical therapist. Students will be in the facility full time, five days a week for six weeks. Prerequisites:Exercise and Sport Science 112, 113; Interdisciplinary 356; Physical Therapy 101, 102, 106, 200. Summer.
PT–200 Pathophysiology (3 credits)
Covers basic pathologic conditions and principles. Emphasizes disorders of the musculoskeletal, nervous, cardiopulmonary, and immune systems. Students expected to explain the etiology, signs, symptoms, clinical course, and primary medical interventions of disorders presented. Students also expected to understand how different disease processes affect the patient's ability to participate in physical therapy and achieve an optimal functional outcome. Prerequisites: Exercise and Sport Science 112 and 113 or 221/221L; Interdisciplinary 356; Physical Therapy 102. Summer.
PT–210 Basic Modalities & Techniques Pta III (4 credits)
Student expected to demonstrate manually and in written form treatment techniques for adult patients of all ages with amputations, burns, cardiopulmonary disorders, peripheral vascular disorders, traumatic brain injuries, and wounds. Units on proprioceptive neuromuscular trunk patterns and techniques and women's health issues are presented. Students will experience and demonstrate application of these techniques during simulated patient situations in the laboratory setting. Lecture/Lab. Prerequisites: Physical Therapy 102, 111, 200. Fall.
PT–210L Basic Modalities&Techniques PTA III Lab
Student expected to demonstrate manually and in written form treatment techniques for adult patients of all ages with amputations, burns, cardiopulmonary disorders, peripheral vascular disorders, traumatic brain injuries, and wounds. Units on proprioceptive neuromuscular trunk patterns and techniques and women's health issues are presented. Students will experience and demonstrate application of these techniques during simulated patient situations in the laboratory setting. Lecture/Lab. Prerequisites: Physical Therapy 102, 111, 200. Fall.
PT–249 Clinical II (5 credits)
Student is placed in the clinical setting (40 hours per week for six weeks) to become an active participant in the health care team. Actively involved in the care of patients under the supervision of a PT. Experience develops therapeutic interventions and patient care skills. Prerequisites: Physical Therapy 111, 210, 251. Spring.
PT–250 Clinical III (5 credits)
Final six-week clinical experience continues to develop interventions, techniques, and patient care skills. Upon completion of this affiliation, students are expected to be able to practice as entry-level physical therapist assistants. Prerequisite: Physical Therapy 249. Spring.
PT–251 Neurological Rehabilitation for PTA (4 credits)
Lecture-lab. Basic knowledge of physical therapy interventions is expanded to include the treatment of adults and children with neuromuscular conditions including stroke, spinal cord injuries, and developmental disabilities. Emphasizes student's development of psychomotor skills to facilitate functional patient movement. Students demonstrate various physical therapy interventions and discuss patient progression as outlined in patient's plan of care. Students expected to accurately assess patient status and document patient findings. Experiential opportunities, clinical simulations, role playing, and small group learning activities reinforce mastery of content. Prerequisites: Physical Therapy 111, 200. Corequisite: Physical Therapy 210. Fall.
PT–251L Neurological Rehab Lab
Lecture-lab. Basic knowledge of physical therapy interventions is expanded to include the treatment of adults and children with neuromuscular conditions including stroke, spinal cord injuries, and developmental disabilities. Emphasizes student's development of psychomotor skills to facilitate functional patient movement. Students demonstrate various physical therapy interventions and discuss patient progression as outlined in patient's plan of care. Students expected to accurately assess patient status and document patient findings. Experiential opportunities, clinical simulations, role playing, and small group learning activities reinforce mastery of content. Prerequisites: Physical Therapy 111, 200. Corequisite: Physical Therapy 210. Fall.
PT–252 Professional Issues for PTA (2 credits)
Lecture-seminar course discusses current, professional issues that affect the practice of physical therapy and the role of the PTA. Students examine various ways in which a PTA functions as a member of the health care delivery team. Addresses the role of the assistant in department activities, specialized areas of practice and the American Physical Therapy Association. Prerequisites: Physical Therapy 210, 251. Spring.
PT–370 Special Topics in Physical Therapy (1-3 credits)
Allows students to pursue areas of special interest within health care or physical therapy. Areas may include research, clinical education, administration, and classroom or community teaching. Students responsible for contacting the designated faculty member to discuss and plan the experience. Experience culminates in a formal written document, product, or reflection paper.

Doctor of Physical Therapy Courses (DPT)

PT–410 Foundations of PT (2 credits)
This course introduces the foundational proficiencies necessary for practice in the profession of physical therapy. Topics include body mechanics, elements of documentation (initial encounter, daily note, re-examination, discharge summary), effects of inactivity, foundations of therapeutic exercise, infection control, mobility training, patient/client equipment, patient/client stress, positioning and turning, posture preparation for patient/client care, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation trunk and extremity patterns, range of motion exercise, stretching exercise, transfer training, vital signs, wheelchairs, and wound management. Principles from the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice are incorporated into the course and written documentation, as suggested by the guide, is utilized for specific lab activities. Students participate in initial field experiences in an acute care, inpatient rehabilitation, and pediatric facility. Prerequisite: Physical Therapy 431.
PT–410L Foundations of PT Lab
Lab that accompanies PT 410, Foundations of Physical Therapy.
PT–412 Health Policy/Management (2 credits)
This lecture/lab course provides the student with an introduction to the therapeutic modality skills necessary for practice in the profession of physical therapy. Includes electrical stimulation, hydrotherapy, massage, thermal modalities, traction, and ultrasound. Principles from the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice are incorporated into these skills and written documentation, as suggested by the guide, is utilized for specific lab activities. Prerequisite: Physical Therapy 431.
PT–414 Patient Mgt II (2 credits)
This course provides the student with an introduction to commonly performed therapeutic exercise interventions. An emphasis will be placed on understanding therapeutic exercise from a motor control perspective and how pain affects motor control and exercise. Through lecture and laboratory experiences common exercise progressions as they relate to high volume conditions encountered in outpatient physical therapy practice will be covered. Students will learn therapeutic exercise techniques, which will be utilized in future patient management courses emphasizing the current best evidence. Prerequisite: Physical Therapy 431.
PT–414L C
Lab that accompanies PT 414, Foundations of Therapeutic Exercise.
PT–417 Test & Measurements (2 credits)
Introduces basic procedures for objective assessment of the musculoskeletal system through measurement of joint range of motion (ROM) and muscle strength. Laboratory sessions allow practice in the techniques of goniometry and manual muscle testing (MMT). Inclinometers and hand-held dynamometers introduced. Opportunity to learn about isokinetic testing at local outpatient clinics. Prerequisites: Biology 436; Physical Therapy 411, 413, 432, 434, 442, 451. Spring.
PT–417L Tests & Measurements Lab
Introduces basic procedures for objective assessment of the musculoskeletal system through measurement of joint range of motion (ROM) and muscle strength. Laboratory sessions allow practice in the techniques of goniometry and manual muscle testing (MMT). Inclinometers and hand-held dynamometers introduced. Opportunity to learn about isokinetic testing at local outpatient clinics. Prerequisites: Biology 436; Physical Therapy 411, 413, 432, 434, 442, 451. Spring.
PT–421 Patient Management I (8 credits)
Initiates patient management sequence. Expands upon the anatomical, kinesiological, and therapeutic exercise principles presented in previous courses. Emphasis on examination and assessment of the musculoskeletal system. Common conditions and impairments are presented and reinforced through use of case examples. Appropriate interventions are addressed conceptually and performed in the laboratory. Addresses concepts and techniques related to proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation. Medical documentation integrated into laboratory activities and assignments. Experiential opportunities included. Prerequisites: Biology 436; Physical Therapy 411, 413, 432, 434, 442, 451. Corequisite: Physical Therapy 417. Spring.
PT–422 Patient Management II (3 credits)
Applies principles of rehabilitation science to patients with disorders of the cardiovascular or pulmonary systems. Topics include pathophysiology, patient assessment, medical and surgical management of disease, and safety aspects. The course emphasizes the design, implementation, and administration of a team-based approach to cardiovascular and pulmonary rehabilitation and disease prevention. Prerequisites: Biology 436, Physical Therapy 411, 413, 432, 434, 442, and 451. Spring.
PT–422L Patient Management II - Lab
Applies principles of rehabilitation science to patients with disorders of the cardiovascular or pulmonary systems. Topics include pathophysiology, patient assessment, medical and surgical management of disease, and safety aspects. The course emphasizes the design, implementation, and administration of a team-based approach to cardiovascular and pulmonary rehabilitation and disease prevention. Prerequisites: All PT numbered courses prior to Spring of the first year of the professional program plus BIOL 436. Spring.
PT–423 Wellness in Physical Therapy (2 credits)
Addresses issues related to wellness, health promotion, health maintenance, and fitness and how these concepts can be incorporated into physical therapy practice. Areas of learning include primary health theory; needs; epidemiological factors; principles of exercise and physical fitness; effects of the environment, fitness, and nutrition on wellness; principles of motivation and behavior modification in health promotion; assessment techniques; development of a personal wellness profile; and identification of a specialized wellness program. Prerequisite: Physical Therapy 561. Fall.
PT–431 Gross Anatomy (5 credits)
For students in the physical therapy program. Emphasis on gross anatomy of the human skeleton, muscular, vascular, and nervous systems. Knowledge of gross anatomy provides students with a sound foundation upon which other courses in the physical therapy curriculum can directly or indirectly be related. Content presented in a regional approach, and includes anatomical concepts such as proper terminology, surface anatomy, and joint function. Gross anatomy is best learned in the laboratory through dissection of the human body. Course is primarily a laboratory experience. Prerequisite: Admission to the DPT program. Summer.
PT–431L Gross Anatomy Lab
For students in the physical therapy program. Emphasis on gross anatomy of the human skeleton, muscular, vascular, and nervous systems. Knowledge of gross anatomy provides students with a sound foundation upon which other courses in the physical therapy curriculum can directly or indirectly be related. Content presented in a regional approach, and includes anatomical concepts such as proper terminology, surface anatomy, and joint function. Gross anatomy is best learned in the laboratory through dissection of the human body. Course is primarily a laboratory experience. Prerequisite: Admission to the DPT program. Summer.
PT–432 Kinesiology (2 credits)
Introduces elements and principles basic to the study of human movement. Includes principles of basic biomechanics as well as biomechanical behavior of biological tissues. Discusses concepts of kinetics, kinematics, length-tension relationships, and the functional significance of the structure of biological tissues. Emphasizes clinical application of mechanical concepts. Prerequisites: Physical Therapy 431, 441. Fall.
PT–432L Kinesiology Lab
Introduces elements and principles basic to the study of human movement. Includes principles of basic biomechanics as well as biomechanical behavior of biological tissues. Discusses concepts of kinetics, kinematics, length-tension relationships, and the functional significance of the structure of biological tissues. Emphasizes clinical application of mechanical concepts. Prerequisites: Physical Therapy 431, 441. Fall.
PT–434 Medical Pathology (3 credits)
Explores consequences of disruption in normal physiological and developmental processes. Common diseases and disorders involving all major body systems addressed, as well as selected systemic diseases. Topics include diseases of infectious, immune system, traumatic, degenerative, and congenital origin. Focuses on pathogenesis, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, prognosis, medical intervention including pharmacological agents, and implications related to physical therapy practice. Prerequisites: Physical Therapy 431, 441. Fall.
PT–435 Foundations in Biomechanics (1 credit)
Covers principles of physics, mechanics, trigonometry, geometry, physiology, anatomy and other related sciences applied to analysis of human motion. Summer.
PT–441 Clinical & Professional Issues I (2 credits)
First in series of clinical and professional issues courses. Provides introduction to professional practice expectations of physical therapy. Provides orientation and strategies for success in the professional program. Introduction to American Physical Therapy Association. Students explore the practice of physical therapy utilizing the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice and the core values of the profession. Introduction to professional ethics and communication required in professional relationships. Prerequisite: Admission to the DPT program. Summer.
PT–442 Clinical & Professional Issues II (2 credits)
Second in series of four clinical and professional issues courses. Focuses on physical therapist's role as an educator and developing one's own cultural competence. Provides introduction to federal programs, including Medicare and Medicaid. Prerequisites: Physical Therapy 431, 441. Fall.
PT–451 Scientific Inquiry I (2 credits)
This is the first in a series of courses designed to prepare the physical therapist for practice in an evidence-based environment. Topics to be addressed in the series include research design and analysis, research ethics, and critical appraisal of published research in the areas of diagnosis, prognosis, intervention, and harm. Prerequisites: Physical Therapy 431, 441. Fall.
PT–452 Scientific Inquiry II (2 credits)
This is the second in a series of courses designed to prepare the physical therapist for practice in an evidence-based environment. Topics to be addressesd in the series include research design and analysis, research ethics, and critical appraisal of published research in the areas of diagnosis, prognosis, intervention, and harm. Prerequisites: Biology 436 and Physical Therapy 411, 413, 432, 434, 442, 451, or permission of the instructor. Spring.
PT–523 Patient Management III (4 credits)
Studies physical therapy management of patients with amputations, integumentary and oncologic disorders, as well as acute and chronic disorders seen in the older adult. Student expected to discuss the medical, surgical, and pharmacological management of these conditions. Emphasis on problem solving with material presented in module format. Laboratory activities include balance assessment, wound assessment and management, lymphedema interventions including bandaging, geriatric screening, functional assessments, and exercise for the elderly. Concepts associated with limb amputations and prosthetic devices addressed in laboratory setting. Students participate in an observational experience in a prosthetic clinic, as well as at a health care facility specializing in wound care. Prerequisites: Physical Therapy 421, 422, 561. Fall.
PT–523L Patient Management III Lab
Studies physical therapy management of patients with amputations, integumentary and oncologic disorders, as well as acute and chronic disorders seen in the older adult. Student expected to discuss the medical, surgical, and pharmacological management of these conditions. Emphasis on problem solving with material presented in module format. Laboratory activities include balance and falls assessment, wound assessment and management, lymphedema interventions including bandaging, geriatric screening, functional assessments, and exercise for the elderly. Concepts associated with limb amputations and prosthetic devices addressed in laboratory setting. Students participate in an observational experience in a prosthetic clinic, as well as at a health care facility specializing in wound care. Prerequisites: Physical Therapy 421, 561. Fall.
PT–524 Pediatric Physical Therapy (3 credits)
Studies developmental disabilities that impact infants and children's posture and movement across the life span. Presents examination and evaluation of infants and children with specific congenital and acquired disorders. Physical therapy management including handling and positioning, developmental activities, use of adaptive equipment,and orthoses presented in lecture and lab format. Actual patient and video demonstrations used when possible for reinforcement along with experiential learning, case studies, and treatment planning activities. Prerequisites: Physical Therapy 434, 533, 561. Spring.
PT–524L Pediatric Physical Therapy Lab
Studies developmental disabilities that impact infants and children's posture and movement across the life span. Presents examination and evaluation of infants and children with specific congenital and acquired disorders. Physical therapy management including handling and positioning, developmental activities, use of adaptive equipment, and orthoses presented in lecture and lab format. Actual patient and video demonstrations used when possible for reinforcement along with experiential learning, case studies, and treatment planning activities. Prerequisites: Physical Therapy 434, 533, 561. Spring.
PT–526 Patient Management IV (7 credits)
Studies physical therapy management of the patient with neurologic dysfunction, including stroke, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, and multiple progressive conditions. Pathology, etiology, and natural history of these disorders are presented in tandem with their medical, surgical, and pharmacological management. Students are expected to be able to examine and evaluate patients with neurological dysfunction by selecting appropriate tests and measures, developing efficacious plans of care, implementing therapeutic interventions, and documenting results using the Guide format. Students are also expected to provide a rationale for all decisions made as part of this patient management process. Experiential opportunities, clinical simulations, role playing, small group learning activities, and video demonstrations are used with problem-solving exercises to reinforce mastery of the material. Prerequisites: Physical Therapy 531, 561. Spring.
PT–526L Patient Management IV Lab
Physical therapy management of the patient with neurologic dysfunction, including stroke, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, and multiple progressive conditions. Pathology, etiology, and natural history of these disorders presented in tandem with their medical, surgical, and pharmacological management. Students expected to be able to examine and evaluate by selecting appropriate tests and measures, develop efficacious plans of care, and implement therapeutic interventions for patients with neurologic dysfunction. Students expected to provide a rationale for all decisions made as part of this management process. Experiential opportunities, clinical simulations, role playing, small group learning activities, and video demonstrations are used with problem solving exercises to reinforce mastery of the material. Prerequisites: Physical Therapy 531, 561. Spring.
PT–531 Neurobiology (3 credits)
Lecture-lab. Normal development of the brain and spinal cord and the gross anatomy of these structures examined. Laboratory provides opportunity to study human specimens and models to gain a three-dimensional understanding of the central nervous system during first part of course. Subsequently, pathways and associated structures that mediate general sensory, special sensory, autonomic, and somatic motor functions are described and the consequences of lesions of these pathways discussed. Prerequisite: Physical Therapy 561. Fall.
PT–531L Neurobiology Lab
Lecture-lab. Normal development of the brain and spinal cord and the gross anatomy of these structures examined. Laboratory provides opportunity to study human specimens and models to gain a three-dimensional understanding of the central nervous system during first part of course. Subsequently, pathways and associated structures that mediate general sensory, special sensory, autonomic, and somatic motor functions are described and the consequences of lesions of these pathways discussed. Prerequisite: Physical Therapy 561. Fall.
PT–533 Human Growth & Development (3 credits)
Presents typical human development from conception to death including functional changes in posture and movement. Presents processes of growth, maturation, adaptation, motor control, and motor learning. Discusses concepts of critical period, health risk, physiologic reserve, and senescence. The relationship of physical, cognitive, and social theories of human development and age-related system changes are given. Views motor behavior across life span within a social and psychological context. Prerequisite: Physical Therapy 561. Fall.
PT–541 Ethical Decision Making in Health Care (2 credits)
Continuation of clinical and professional issues course sequence which encourages value clarification and ethical decision making and its relationship to health care. Various situations, dilemmas, and individuals utilized to represent topics discussed. Topics intended to develop and heighten awareness of dilemmas faced by health care providers and their patients. Lecture. Prerequisites: Physical Therapy 441, 442, 561. Fall.
PT–543 Leadership & Administration (3 credits)
PT–544 Behavioral Psychology (2 credits)
Draws together theoretical constructs of psychology, neuropsychological, and behavioral medicine to help explain the etiology of expected behavioral and emotional responses to compromised motor function and neurologic impairment typically experienced by patients in physical therapy rehabilitation and to provide guidance in management of these patients. Prerequisite: Physical Therapy 531, 561. Spring.
PT–551 Scientific Inquiry III (2 credits)
This couse is the third in a series of five courses designed to prepare the graduate to practice in an evidence-based manner and to be an astute consumer and judge of scientific research. Topics include inferential statistics, probability and probability distributions, and various bivariate parametric and non-parametric statistical tests.
PT–552 Scientific Inquiry IV (2 credits)
This is the fourth in a series of courses designed to prepare the physical therapist for practice in an evidence-based environment. Topics to be addressed in the series include research design and analysis, research ethics, and critical appraisal of published research in the areas of diagnosis, prognosis, intervention, and harm. Prerequisites: Physical Therapy 522, 523, 531, 533, 541, and 551 or permission of the instructor. Spring.
PT–561 Clinical I (5 credits)
Active participation in this fulltime clinical course emphasizes development of professional behavior, written and verbal communication skills, and evaluation, examination, and interventions previously addressed in didactic course work. Emphasizes physical therapy management of musculoskeletal conditions. Prerequisites: All 400 level physical therapy course work; completion of undergraduate degree. Summer.
PT–570 Special Topics in Physical Therapy (1-3 credits)
Students pursue an area of special interest within health care or the physical therapy profession. Areas may include, but are not limited to, research, clinical education, administration, and classroom or community teaching. Students responsible for contacting the designated faculty member to discuss and plan the experience. This experience culminates in a formal written document, product or reflection paper.
PT–626 Patient Management V (5 credits)
Builds on previously acquired examination and intervention skills related to musculoskeletal patient management. Emphasis on examination and subsequent evaluation leading to the physical therapy diagnosis for the adult and athletic population. Covers, in detail, evidence-based interventions emphasizing manual therapy and therapeutic exercise in lecture and laboratory sessions. Includes examination and intervention models utilized in contemporary clinical practice such as functional movement training, and McKenzie. Specific techniques include muscle energy, neural mobilization, trigger points, joint mobilization/manipulation, and segmental stabilization for the spine. Therapeutic exercise and sport-specific progressions addressed in relation to commonly encountered physical impairments. Master clinicians and physicians share expertise through classroom and laboratory presentations related to each topic covered. Students learn to utilize these concepts and techniques to develop comprehensive patient management programs. Students may participate in an athletic event coverage observational experience. Prerequisites: Physical Therapy 526, 661. Fall.
PT–626L Patient Management V Lab
Builds on previously acquired examination and intervention skills related to musculoskeletal patient management. Emphasis on examination and subsequent evaluation leading to the physical therapy diagnosis for the adult and athletic population. Covers, in detail, evidence-based interventions emphasizing manual therapy and therapeutic exercise in lecture and laboratory sessions. Includes examination and intervention models utilized in contemporary clinical practice such as movement balance, Cyriax, and McKenzie. Specific techniques include strain/counterstrain, muscle energy, neural mobilization, joint mobilization/manipulation, and segmental stabilization for the spine. Therapeutic exercise and sport-specific progressions addressed in relation to commonly encountered physical impairments. Master clinicians and physicians share expertise through classroom and laboratory presentations related to each topic covered. Students learn to utilize these concepts and techniques to develop comprehensive patient management programs. Students participate in an athletic event coverage observational experience. Prerequisites: Physical Therapy 526, 661. Fall.
PT–627 Community Health (4 credits)
Expands the students' knowledge and experiences in the areas of health promotion, wellness, and autonomous care. Assists the student in analyzing and identifying community health needs. Areas of learning include physical therapist's role in community wellness programs, continued participation in the legislative and political processes as advocates for health and wellness needs of their communities. Additionally, students examine health-related issues for individuals of varying races and ethnicities, national origin, and sexual orientation. Students develop and implement a community-based health promotion, prevention, or wellness program for a specific segment of the population based on a needs assessment. Prerequisite: Physical Therapy 661. Fall.
PT–627L Community Health Lab
Expands the students' knowledge and experiences in the areas of health promotion, wellness, and primary care. Assists the student in analyzing and identifying community health needs. Areas of learning include physical therapist's role in community wellness programs. Students consider governmental reimbursement policies and how they impact patient care and the physical therapist's role in the community. Continued participation in the legislative and political processes as an advocate for health and wellness needs of their communities. Additionally, students examine health-related issues for individuals of varying races and ethnicities, national origin, and sexual orientation. Students work with a group of colleagues to develop and implement a community-based health promotion, prevention, or wellness program for a specific segment of the population based on a needs assessment. Emphasis on the physical therapist's roles in primary care and in direct access situations. Prerequisite: Physical Therapy 661. Fall.
PT–628 Advanced Screening and Differential Diagnosis (3 credits)
Enables students to function as independent health care providers with the ability to identify signs and symptoms that fall outside the scope of physical therapy practice and to refer clients appropriately to additional medical care. Addresses strategies to identify source of various signs and symptoms. Tools used in course include questionnaires based on presenting symptoms. Questionnaires to be used as a guide in history-taking and inter-practitioner communication. Prerequisite: Physical Therapy 661. Fall.
PT–631 Rehabilitation Pharmacology (2 credits)
Presents basic aspects of the mechanism of action of drugs commonly employed in the practice of rehabilitation. Fundamental principles of drug action are followed by an in-depth discussion of specific drugs used. Topics include pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, pharmacoeconomics, drug interactions, polypharmacy, and adverse drug reactions. Prerequisite: Physical Therapy 661.
PT–632 Medical Imaging (1 credit)
Covers basic principles of diagnostic imaging pertinent to clinical practice. Familiarizes student with magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, ultrasonography, and plain film studies of the spine and extremities. Students view and interpret normal and abnormal images for these modalities. Student examines research related to diagnostic imaging with regard to sensitivity, specificity, and correlation with clinical findings. Prerequisite: Physical Therapy 661. Corequisite: Physical Therapy 626. Fall.
PT–642 Clinical and Professional Issues IV (2 credits)
This course is the culmination of the series of clinical and professional issues courses. The course is focused on the processes involved in the transition from student to new professional. Content includes career planning topics such as interviewing, résumé building, and professional licensure as well as opportunities and responsibilities of the new professional. The importance of becoming a high-performance, well-balanced professional will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Physical Therapy 661. Fall.
PT–651 Scientific Inquiry V (2 credits)
This is the fifth in a series of courses designed to prepare the physical therapist for practice in an evidence-based environment. Topics to be addressed in the series include research design and analysis, research ethics, and critical appraisal of published research in the areas of diagnosis, prognosis, intervention, and harm. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all previous courses in the DPT program or permission of the instructor. Corequisites: Physical Therapy 662, 663.
PT–661 Clinical II (5 credits)
Full-time clinical experience emphasizes examination, evaluation, and management of patients with neurologic, neuromuscular, cardiopulmonary, or integumentary disorders. Further development of professional interaction skills and written and verbal communication addressed. Prerequisites: All 500-level course work. Summer.
PT–662 Clinical III (5 credits)
Full-time clinical experience assists student in achieving clinical competence as an entry-level physical therapist. Student examines and evaluates patients, and designs, implements, and analyzes a physical therapy plan of care. Includes documentation of test results and patient progress. Can occur in an outpatient, acute care, or rehabilitation setting. Student can manage musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, neurologic, and geriatric pathologies, as well as developmental disabilities and cardiopulmonary dysfunction. Prerequisites: Physical Therapy 626, 627, 628, 631, 632, 642. Corequisites: Physical Therapy 651, 663. Spring.
PT–663 Clinical IV (5 credits)
Full-time clinical experience completes achievement of clinical competence as an entry-level physical therapist. Student examines and evaluates patients, and designs, implements, and analyzes a physical therapy plan of care as an entry-level practitioner. Professional communication and socialization further developed. Clinical experience can occur in an outpatient, acute care, rehabilitation, or specialized setting. Prerequisites: All 500 level physical therapy courses; Physical Therapy 661. Corequisites: Physical Therapy 651, 662. Spring.