Psychology

Course Offerings

PSYC–121 Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)
Surveys major areas of psychology, including methodology, learning, memory, development, personality, psychopathology, and additional areas. Focuses on historical development, research findings, and applications in contemporary life. Fall, spring, summer.
PSYC–125 Introduction to Behavioral Neuroscience (3 credits)
Surveys development, organization, and function of the human brain and nervous system - how we sense, move, feel, and think. Introduces neural bases of mood, emotion, sleep, learning, memory, language, and attention. Assumes minimal prior knowledge of biology, physics, and chemistry. Fall, spring.
PSYC–201 Psychology: Fields of Application (1 credit)
PSYC–205 Special Topics in Psychology (3 credits)
Examines specific topics in psychology through a seminar or workshop format. Prerequisite: Psychology 121 or permission of instructor.
PSYC–225 Lifespan Development (3 credits)
PSYC–226 Child & Adolescent Psychology (3 credits)
Examines developmental stages from conception through adolescence, giving special emphasis to physical, cognitive, social, and emotional aspects related to maturational as well as learning processes. Prerequisite: Psychology 121. Fall, spring.
PSYC–229 Social Psychology (3 credits)
Considers broad range effects of a social context on individual and group behavior. Examines interpersonal relations and actions, attitude developments and change, group dynamics, how we justify individual actions, advertising and news, prejudice and stereotyping, love and sex, leadership, and work environments as they relate to and affect behavior. Prerequisite: Psychology 121. Fall, spring.
PSYC–245 Statistics for Psychologists (4 credits)
Introduces descriptive statistics, probability, decision theory, and testing of hypotheses by both parametric and nonparametric tests. Emphasizes basic concepts, SPSS computer analysis, and APA-format presentation of results. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisites: Nine hours of psychology, including Psychology 121; general education mathematics requirement. Fall.
PSYC–245L Statistics for Psychologist Lab
Introduces descriptive statistics, probability, decision theory, and testing of hypotheses by both parametric and nonparametric tests. Emphasizes basic concepts, SPSS computer analysis, and APA-format presentation of results. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisites: Nine hours of psychology, including Psychology 121; general education mathematics requirement. Fall.
PSYC–246 Research Methods in Psychology (4 credits)
Emphasizes scientific basis of psychology. Explores research methods of modern psychology. Covers use of statistics in design of behavioral experiments. Example experiments are conducted to aid comprehension. Students gain skills necessary for management of simple research and interpretation of research reports. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisites: Psychology 121, 245. Fall, spring.
PSYC–246L Res Methods in Psychology Lab
Emphasizes scientific basis of psychology. Explores research methods of modern psychology. Covers use of statistics in design of behavioral experiments. Example experiments are conducted to aid comprehension. Students gain skills necessary for management of simple research and interpretation of research reports. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisites: Psychology 121, 245. Fall, spring.
PSYC–259 Abnormal Psychology (3 credits)
Examines abnormal behavior with emphasis on mood disorders, affective disorders, and schizophrenia. Examines the biological and psychological bases of psychopathology and those factors involved in diagnosis and treatment of mental disorder. Prerequisite: Psychology 121. Fall, spring.
PSYC–320 Psychology and the Law (3 credits)
Examines how psychological research contributes to understanding our legal system. Topics include the reliability of eyewitness testimony; factors that affect jury decision making; interrogation and confessions; psychological profiling; clinical determination of insanity, competence, and future dangerousness; sexual victimization; and race. Prerequisite: Psychology 121; Psychology 246 or Sociology 235. Spring.
PSYC–326 Language Development (3 credits)
Introduces the nature of language development in infancy and childhood. Examines cognitive, developmental, environmental, and physiological influences on language skills. Theories of language development and their influences on research and our understanding of children discussed. Topics include perception of sounds, acquisition of grammar, first and second language learning, and developmental language disorders. Relationship between language skills and overall development (social, cognitive, biological) also explored. Recommended Prerequisites: Psychology 121, 226. Spring, alternate years.
PSYC–333 Psychopathology in Children and Adolescents (3 credits)
Studies behavioral characteristics, causes, diagnosis, and treatment of the psychopathological problems of childhood and adolescence including anxiety states, developmental disorders, attention deficit disorder, conduct disorder, and autistic disorder. Discusses assessment and treatment from biological and psychological perspectives. Prerequisite: Psychology 121. Recommended: Psychology 226. Fall.
PSYC–355 Sensation & Perception (3 credits)
Examines perceptual processing of sensory information in vision, hearing, touch, taste, and smell. Examines psychophysics and the influence of personality and environmental factors in human perception. Examines neuropsychology and perceptual abnormalities resulting from brain damage. Prerequisites: Psychology 121, 125 or 357, 245. Spring.
PSYC–356 Industrial Psychology (3 credits)
Examines personnel psychology, organizational psychology, and human factors psychology. Topics include job analysis, recruiting, testing, performance appraisal, leadership, motivation, person-machine systems, workspace design, and stress in the workplace. Prerequisites: Psychology 121; 229. Spring alternate years.
PSYC–357 Neuropsychology (3 credits)
Examines the function and organization of the nervous system and the role of the nervous system in controlling behavior. Topics include nervous system structure and functions as it relates to sensory processing, movement, sleep, reproductive behavior, emotional behavior, learning and memory, stress and health, neurological disorders, and select psychiatric disorders. Current research methodology and experimental findings emphasized. Prerequisites: Biology 100 or higher; Psychology 121. Fall.
PSYC–358 Neuropsychology Lab (1 credit)
Laboratory course introduces techniques and paradigms of physiological psychology and behavioral neuroscience. Scientific report writing, problems of research design, and data analysis emphasized. Two-hour laboratory. Prerequisites: Biology 100 or higher; Psychology 121. Corequisite or prerequisite: Psychology 357. Fall.
PSYC–366 Cognitive Psychology (3 credits)
The study of how we think. Examines the cognitive processes underlying attention, perception, memory, language, reasoning, and problem-solving. Emphasis on theoretical models and experimental findings. Explores areas of applied cognitive psychology. Prerequisites: Psychology 121, 125. Fall
PSYC–367 Theories of Personality & Psycotherapy Psychotherapy (3 credits)
Survey of major contemporary models of personality and individual psychotherapy. Includes biological, psychoanalytical, humanistic, behavioral, and cognitive models. Prerequisites: 12 hours of psychology, including Psychology 121, 259. Spring.
PSYC–370 Behavior Modification (3 credits)
Studies learning principles as a means for changing behavior in the home, school, mental health settings, and other social situations. Operant, respondent, and cognitive techniques reviewed in terms of doing therapy, increasing self-control, and improving productivity in industry. Focus on modifying both child and adult behavior. Prerequisites: Psychology 121, 259. Fall.
PSYC–379 Child and Family Psychotherapy (3 credits)
Survey of theories and techniques of the most popular approaches to psychotherapy with children, adolescents, and their families. Covers individual therapies such as play, cognitive, and behavior therapies, as well as group and family therapies. Particular attention given to interviewing skills. Prerequisites: Psychology 121, 226, 333. Spring.
PSYC–401 Independent Study-Psychology (1-3 credits)
Provides opportunities for study of subject areas in greater depth. The study is conducted with the guidance and supervision of a department faculty member. Proposed independent studies should be presented to the department at least six weeks before the beginning of the term and must be approved before registration for the course. May be repeated given substantially different content. Students cannot enroll in Psychology 401 for research into a topic that is offered as a standard course within the department. Prerequisites: 15 hours of psychology and sponsorship by the supervising faculty member. Fall, spring, summer.
PSYC–402 Ungrad Research in Psychology (1-4 credits)
Provides opportunities for undergraduate research that involve data collection and formal reporting concerning a specific problem. This research is conducted with the guidance and supervision of a department faculty member. Proposed independent studies should be presented to the department chair at least six weeks before the beginning of the term, include a detailed prospectus of the problem and methodology, including documentation of IRB approval, and must be approved by the department before registration for course credit. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours. Prerequisite: Psychology 121, 245, 246, and sponsorship by the supervising faculty member. Fall, spring, summer.
PSYC–405 Special Topics in Psychology (3 credits)
Examines specific topics in psychology through a seminar or workshop format. Prerequisite: Psychology 121 or permission of instructor.
PSYC–416 Human Sexuality (3 credits)
Covers topics related to human sexuality. Includes sexuality research, anatomy, sexual development, sexual identity and orientation, sexual activity, contraception, sexually transmitted infections, love and relationship, sex and the law, and cross-cultural differences. Exposes students to knowledge and attitudes about human sexuality and challenges them to make informed, ethical choices. Prerequisites: Psychology 121, 229; at least junior standing. Summer, offered periodically.
PSYC–420 Children, Psychology and the Law (3 credits)
PSYC–426 Adv Child & Adolescent Development (3 credits)
Examines developmental stages from conception through adolescence, giving special emphasis to physical, cognitive, social, and emotional aspects related to maturational as well as learning processes. This course builds upon Psychology 226 (Child and Adolescent Psychology) but delves further into each topic so that each student gains a greater appreciation for and understanding of the concepts and processes involved in the development of children. Prerequisites: Psychology 226 or admission into a master's program or permission of the instructor. Summer, offered periodically.
PSYC–431 Stereotyping/Racism/Prejudice (3 credits)
PSYC–445 Psychological Tests and Measurements (3 credits)
Studies the theory, construction, administration, and interpretation of standardized psychological tests used in educational, clinical, and industrial settings. Examines achievement, intelligence, aptitude, interest, and personality tests. Prerequisite: Psychology 121, 245, or permission of instructor. Offered periodically.
PSYC–450 Learning (3 credits)
Examines neurological, environmental, and cognitive factors that influence acquisition and retention of new information or new behaviors. Emphasis on historical theories of classical and instrumental conditioning and how they relate to stimulus control of behavior and animal cognition, including memory. Explores areas of applied learning. Learning concepts reinforced with interaction with a virtual reality program. Prerequisites: Psychology 121, 246. Spring, alternate years.
PSYC–457 Advanced Neuroscience (3 credits)
Detailed study of the human brain and nervous system. Topics cover cellular and molecular neuroscience, neural integration, pharmacology, neuroendocrinology, nervous system development, and plasticity of the central nervous system. Prerequisites: Psychology 121, 357. Spring, alternate years.
PSYC–464 Psycholinguistics (3 credits)
Introduction to psycholinguistics providing overview of language processes including speech perception, meaning representation, language processing, language production and comprehension, and language acquisition. Details theoretical linguistic concepts and their empirical support data. Examines language related to brain, thought, and reading. Prerequisite: Psychology 121. Recommended: Psychology 366. Summer, offered periodically.
PSYC–466 Cognitive Development (3 credits)
Examines development of cognitive skills from birth through adolescence with emphasis on memory, attention, perception, language, and problem solving skills. Discusses major theories of cognitive development with focus on experimental findings. The relationship between biological changes and cognitive abilities explored as is the influence of neurological and physiological impairments. Impact of cognitive skills on academic abilities and performance also discussed. Prerequisites: Psychology 121, 226. Recommended: Psychology 366. Spring, alternate years.
PSYC–489 Field Experience: Internship in Psychology (1-9 credits)
Provides work experience in a preferred field of psychology. Features work experience in area clinics, agencies, schools, and other institutions under guidance of professional personnel. Weekly class discussions focus on ongoing experiences and professional development issues. May be repeated for a maximum of nine hours. Prerequisites: Senior psychology or neuroscience majors; must meet with the instructor at least one month before semester begins to arrange placement. Fall, spring.
PSYC–490 Senior Review & Senior Thesis (3 credits)
Reviews contemporary psychology through readings, student presentations, and discussions. Preparation for the comprehensive examination in psychology. Provides supervision of the senior thesis, which must include a thorough literature review of a topic relevant to personal goals. Thesis may include but does not require original research. Prerequisite: Senior psychology or neuroscience major. Fall.
PSYC–526 Adv Child & Adolescent Development (3 credits)
Examines developmental stages from conception through adolescence, giving special emphasis to physical, cognitive, social, and emotional aspects related to maturational as well as learning processes. This course builds upon Psychology 226 (Child and Adolescent Psychology) but delves further into each topic so that each student gains a greater appreciation for and understanding of the concepts and processes involved in the development of children. Prerequisites: Psychology 226 or admission into a master's program or permission of the instructor. Summer, offered periodically.