Andiron Lecture Series - Advertising and Pseudo-Culture: An Analysis of Changing Women’s Portrayal as Reflected in Magazine Advertisements

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Wednesday, October 4, 2017

4:00 p.m.

Room 252, Ridgway University Center, Eykamp Hall, University of Evansville Campus, 1800 Lincoln Ave, Evansville, IN

Atefeh Yazdanparast is an assistant professor of marketing and Mead Johnson Endowed Chair in Business at the University of Evansville. She received her PhD in marketing with a minor in business anthropology from the University of North Texas. She also holds a master of science in marketing and a Bachelor of Science in food science and engineering. She is the chair of the American Marketing Association’s Marketing for Higher Education Special Interest Group. She has been the recipient of the University of Evansville Class of 1961 Faculty Fellowship Award (2017), Global Scholar Award (2015), and Schroeder School of Business Dean’s Research Award (2016 and 2014). Atefeh’s research is focused on consumer decision making and value co-creation. To date, her research has been published in journals such as the Journal of Consumer Psychology, Psychology & Marketing, Journal of Marketing Management, Journal of Consumer Behaviour, Journal of Consumer Marketing, and International Journal of Logistics Management.

The dynamic interplay between marketing systems and political systems has been a substantial macromarketing issue investigated by academic researchers over the past few decades. The present research is inspired by Adorno’s theory of pseudo-culture and aims to investigate how political and socio-cultural ideas are extensively manifested and promoted in mass media by political systems in an attempt to force cultural transformation through consumption. Following a content analysis and a semiotic analysis of print advertisements during important historical eras of Iran, the sharp contrast between the orientations of the Pahlavi and Islamic Republic regimes and its resultant impact on the status and role of women in the society are investigated. The research identifies five major themes underlying pseudo-culture formation and discusses the advertising strategies implemented to support these themes. This work also identifies four major tools utilized in pseudo-culture formation and demonstrates how pseudo-cultures may be formed, promoted, and abolished.

The lecture begins at 4:00 p.m.
Wednesday, October 4, 2017
Eykamp Hall (Room 252), Ridgway University Center

A social gathering with beverages begins at 3:45 p.m.

For further information, call Annette Parks at 812-488-1070 or the William L. Ridgway College of Arts and Sciences at 812-488-2589

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