Ashley Jordan to speak at UE’s Annual History Spring Lecture

Posted: Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Ashley Jordan, the new executive director of the Evansville African American Museum, will be the speaker for the University of Evansville Department of History’s annual History Spring Lecture on March 28. The lecture, which is free and open to the public, begins at 3:00 p.m. in Room 170 (Smythe Lecture Hall), in the Schroeder School of Business Building.

Jordan’s lecture will be based on this quote from Winston Churchill: “History will be kind to me, for I intend to write it.” She will also discuss the Underground Railroad in the Midwest and the migration of African Americans to Ohio. Both topics are Jordan’s research areas and specialties. 

Prior to taking on the role of executive director of the Evansville African American Museum, Jordan served as the curator for the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, as well as the National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center in Wilberforce, Ohio. In addition to her professional experiences in public history, she has served as an adjunct professor for North Central State College in Mansfield, Ohio.

In May 2017, Jordan graduated with her doctorate in United States History from Howard University. She completed her undergraduate degree at Kent State University and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in history with a minor in political science in 2008.

Jordan is also the proud recipient of numerous professional, academic and civic awards including the Pace Setter Award from the Association of African American Museums, a multiple doctoral fellowship recipient for the Filson and the Kentucky Historical Societies and the Black Excellence Award from the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

James MacLeod, chair of UE’s Department of History, said that UE is “very excited to have Dr. Jordan come and deliver this lecture. She is an outstanding scholar and a wonderful communicator, and we are hoping this event will resonate with students of all majors, not just those who study history.”

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