Course Offerings

BIOL–119 Introductory Bio: Molecular Perspectives (4 credits)
Course designed for students majoring in applied biology, professional biology, biochemistry, neuroscience and clinical lab science. Introduces basic principles of biochemistry, molecular biology and genetics, and their relevance to modern society. Four hours integrated lecture and lab.
BIOL–120 Introductory Biolog: Organismal Diversit (4 credits)
Provides an introduction to the major groups of living organisms, with an emphasis on their structure, function, and evolutionary relationships. Four hours of integrated lecture and lab.
BIOL–331 Genetics (4 credits)
Fundamental principles of inheritance in animals, plants, and microorganisms with emphasis on molecular genetics. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Prerequisite: Biology 107 or 117 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. Recommended: Biology 108 with a grade of C- or better. Fall, spring.
BIOL–340 Cellular and Molecular Biology (4 credits)
BIOL 340 will cover the principles of eukaryotic cell structure and function and the molecular bases of cellular processes. Topics will include: macromolecules; energetics; membranes; cellular organelles; gene expression; signaling; cell division; DNA replication; RNA and protein synthesis and processing; and molecular aspects of immunology, cancer and recombinant DNA technology. The course will build on the survey knowledge from the required prerequisite courses.
BIOL–430 Microbiology (4 credits)
Covers general principles of bacterial growth and activities. Three hours lecture, four hours lab. Prerequisite: Biology 107 or 117 with a grade of C or better; or permission of instructor. Recommended: Biology 109 with a grade of C- or better. Fall.
BIOL–434 Parasitology (4 credits)
Studies the nature of parasitism with respect to morphology, physiology, and host parasite relationships. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisites: Biology 107 or 117, 108 with a grade of C- or better; or permission of instructor. Fall, alternate years.
BIOL–442 Immunology (4 credits)
Studies cellular and molecular aspects of the immune response. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisites: Biology 107 or 117, 108, 440 and Chemistry 240 with a grade of C or better; or permission of instructor. Spring, alternate years.
CHEM–240 Organic Chemistry I (4 credits)
Introduction to the structure, nomenclature, and chemistry of carbon compounds. Covers all major functional group classes and their simple characteristic reactions. Introduces mechanistic considerations as a basis for understanding reactions. Laboratory includes basic techniques, simple reactions, and qualitative analysis. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Prerequisite: Chemistry 118 with a grade of C- or better. Spring.
CHEM–341 Organic Chemistry II (5 credits)
Studies the reactions of organic and bioorganic molecules organized around mechanistic principles. Introduces multistep syntheses and synthetic strategies. Laboratory includes studies of reactions, synthesis, and identification of compounds. Four hours lecture, four hours lab. Prerequisite: Chemistry 240 with a grade of C- or better. Fall.
CHEM–360 Quantitative Analysis (4 credits)
Studies fundamental principles of chemical analysis and their application. Topics include data handling, chemical equilibrium, gravimetric and volumetric analysis, and certain instrumental methods of analysis. Laboratory experiments illustrate realistic examples of chemical analysis. Three hours lecture, four hours lab. Prerequisite: Chemistry 240 or 280 with a grade of C- or better, or permission of instructor. Fall.
CHEM–370 Biochemistry I (3 credits)
An introduction to biologically important molecules and their role in biological systems at a cellular level. Three hours lecture. Prerequisite: Chemistry 341. Fall.
EXSS–112 Human Anatomy and Physiology 1 (4 credits)
First half of a two-semester course that provides a comprehensive study of the structure and function of the human body, from the cell to the entire organism. Uses a systems approach emphasizing how these systems work together to maintain homeostasis. Systems studied include: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, digestive, reproductive. Three hours lecture, two hours lab.
EXSS–113 Human Anatomy and Physiology 2 (4 credits)
Second half of a two-semester course continues study of the structure and function of the human body using a systems approach. Systems studied include: nervous, endocrine, circulatory, immune, respiratory, urinary. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisite: Exercise and Sport Science 112 with a grade of C- or better.
EXSS–150 Introduction to Health Sciences (2 credits)
Overview of the career opportunities available in exercise and sport science. Each student develops a personal profile which includes factors that influence an individual's career choice. Included in this profile is the development of both a personal and professional philosophy, assessment of one's lifestyle preferences, plus a professional research project in one's preferred career choice.
EXSS–478 Clinical Laboratory Science Clinical
Credit granted upon successful completion of two semesters of clinical experience and a summer clinical. Prerequisite: Successful admission into clinical laboratory program.
PT–100 Medical Terminology (1 credit)
Utilizes guided independent student learning activities to teach the basic prefixes, suffixes, and roots of medical terms. Assists student in utilizing medical terminology appropriately in both written and verbal forms. Fall, spring.
PHYS–122 Algebra Physics II (4 credits)
Continues Physics 121. Presents basic principles of electricity, magnetism, light, relativity, atomic, and nuclear physics. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisite: Physics 121.
QM–227 Introduction to Statistics (3 credits)
General purpose introduction to principles of analysis and inference under conditions of uncertainty. Focuses on the logic of statistical inference. Topics include probability, probability distributions, random variables, sampling and sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and linear regression and correlation. Prerequisite: Proficiency in algebra at introductory level. Credit not given for both Quantitative Methods 227 and either Psychology 245 or Sociology 344.

Office Phone:
812-488-1026

Office Email:
dr24@evansville.edu

Office Location:
Room 219, Wallace Graves Hall