News

Finde us on Facebook

Clark Kimberling publishes article

Clark Kimberling, University of Evansville professor of mathematics, and co-authors Takao Komatsu (Wuhan University, China), Kálmán Liptai (Eszterházy Károly University, Hungary), and László Szalay (West Hungary University) have published an article titled "A Connection between Hyper-Fibonacci Numbers and Fissions of Polynomial Sequences." 

The article appears in the current issue of The Fibonacci Quarterly.

Azarian publishes unsolved problems

Mohammad K. Azarian, University of Evansville professor of mathematics, published six problems in the Russian series, The Kourovka Notebook:  Unsolved Problems in Group Theory. 

These six problems consist of 13 questions and two conjectures. All are related to the topic of generalized free products of groups with amalgamations, his earliest area of research. Currently they are published electronically in arXive.org at Cornell University. The final paper version will appear both in the Russian language as well as in English.

Math students and professors publish research

Pengcheng Xiao, assistant professor of mathematics, has published two papers with UE students.

The first paper is titled "Revisit Language Modeling Competition and Extinction: A Data-Driven Validation." and is published in the Journal of Applied Mathematics and Physics. Chosila Sutantawibul (physics graduate), Sarah Richie (physics graduate), and Daniela Fuentes-Rivero (math graduate) are the coauthors. This study is an extension work based on math senior seminar project under the supervision of Xiao. UE Global Scholar supports this research publication.

The second paper is titled "A simplification and analysis of the HPA axis model." and is published in Communications in Mathematical Biology and Neuroscience. Adam Lonnberg (math) and Tuan Nguyen, assistant professor of mathematics are the coauthors. This work is funded by the Dr. Guy Banta BMD Summer Research Fellowship and UExplore research grant.

Azarian publishes research paper

Mohammad K. Azarian, professor of mathematics, published a paper entitled, Risala al-watar wa'l jaib ("The Treatise on the Chord and Sine")-Revisited, in Forum Geometricorum. The purpose of this paper was three-fold. First, Azarian used Jamshid al-Kashi's [Kashani's] famous cubic equation and a mathematica program to calculate sine of one degree to over 11,200,000 decimal digits of accuracy; an amazing improvement over the 17 digits of accuracy that Kashani found by pencil and paper in 1426. Then, Azarian conjectured that Kashani's cubic equation can be used to calculate sine of one degree to any desired accuracy. Second, Azarian set the record straight about the number of correct digits obtained by Kashani that were reported in many previous studies. Third, Azarian commented on some statements that he made in his previous paper on this topic.

Dave Dwyer awarded Eykamp Prize at 160th Commencement

Through the generosity the Eykamp Family, an award for members of UE faculty was created to recognize those who have displayed extraordinary service to the University.

This year, the Eykamp Prize was awarded to David Dwyer, mathematics professor and chair of the math department.

During his tenure at UE, Dwyer has received the Dean’s Teaching Award, the Alumni Association’s Outstanding Teacher Award, and the Berger Award for Scholarship.

He secured two NSF grants totaling over $700,000, which funded the development of a textbook that is currently used in the University’s calculus sequence. He was instrumental in the decision to create a statistics and data science program, and sought grants to fund its development.

Dwyer has been a member, chair, and co-chair of numerous campus committees. Recently he was a faculty representative on the Presidential Search Committee. Most notably, Dwyer spearheaded the Moonshot group of arts and sciences faculty who have put additional effort into assisting the Office of Admission.

Dave Dwyer awarded Eykamp Prize at 160th Commencement

Dean's Teaching Awards

The academic deans have awarded the Dean’s Teaching Awards for 2018-19. The faculty members being honored are:

Andrew Lampkins, associate professor of physician assistant science, from the College of Education and Health Sciences;

Suresh Immanuel Selvaraj, associate professor civil engineering, from the College of Engineering and Computer Science;

Atefeh Yazdanparast Ardestani, assistant professor of marketing, from the Schroeder Family School of Business Administration;

Mark Shifflet, professor of communication, from the William L. Ridgway College of Arts and Sciences; and

Adam Salminen, associate professor of mathematics, also from the William L. Ridgway College of Arts and Sciences.

Congratulations to our deserving faculty members.

Math students present research at Rose-Hulman

University of Evansville math students Sean Russell and Zeyu Zhang presented research at the 35th Rose-Hulman Undergraduate Mathematics Conference on Saturday, April 21.

Russell's talk is titled: "Variants of the Monty Hall Problem and Battleship." The research project is under the supervision of associate professor of math Adam Salminen.

Zhang's talk is titled: "Smoking Dynamics with Health Education Effect." The research project is under the supervision of assistant professor of math Pengcheng Xiao.

Xiao publishes research

Pengcheng Xiao, assistant professor of mathematics, has published a paper in the International Journal of Bifurcations and Chaos(IJBC). IJBC is widely regarded as the leading journal in the exciting field of chaos and nonlinear science.

The paper is titled "Seizure Dynamics of Coupled Oscillators with Epileptor Field Model".

The study is the continuous collaboration work with Professor Honghui Zhang at Northwestern Polytechnical University.

UE math students and professor have paper accepted for publication

University of Evansville math students Keenen Cates, Zeyu Zhang, and Calvin Dailey and Pengcheng Xiao, UE assistant professor of mathematics, have had a paper accepted for publication in the Journal of Data Science.

This study is an extension work based on math senior seminar project under the supervision of Xiao.

The paper is titled" Can Emoticons be used to predict sentiment? "

Getting a machine to understand the meaning of language is a largely important goal to a wide variety of fields, from advertising to entertainment. This work focuses on YouTube comments from the top two hundred trending videos as a source of user text data. Previous Sentiment Analysis Models focus on using hand-labelled data or predetermined lexicons. The goal is to train a model to label comment sentiment with emoticons by training on other user-generated comments containing emoticons. Naive Bayes and Recurrent Neural Network models are both investigated and implemented in this study, and the validation accuracies for Naive Bayes model and Recurrent Neural Network model are found to be .548 and .812.

Azarian publishes reviews of research papers

Mohammad K. Azarian, professor of mathematics, published reviews of two research papers in the American Mathematical Society's Mathematical Reviews (MathSciNet), the authoritative gateway to the scholarly literature of mathematics.

The first paper, by Tamás Lengyel and Diego Marques, entitled " The 2-Order of Some Generalized Fibonacci Numbers," was published in Integers 17 (2017). In this paper the authors fully characterize the 2-adic valuations of the generalized Fibonacci sequence of order 4. They also partially characterize the 2-adic valuations of the generalized Fibonacci sequence of order 5.

The second paper, by Yildiz Aydin and Ali Pancar, entitled "Frattini Supplements and Frat Series", appeared in the Bulletin of the Iranian Mathematical Society 43 (2017). The authors have shown that finite abelian groups are Frattini supplemented, and every conjugate of a Frattini supplement of a subgroup is also a Frattini supplement. Also, they have obtained new characterization of primitivity of groups in terms of Frattini supplemented groups.

Moreover, Azarian accepted the invitation to serve on the editorial board of The Iranian Journal of Mathematical Sciences and Informatics.

Weber publishes paper on mathematical research

Darrin Weber, assistant professor of mathematics, has published a paper in the International Electronic Journal of Algebra. The paper is titled "The Zero-Divisor Graph of a Commutative Ring without Identity" and can be found at http://ieja.net/files/papers/volume-23/11-V23-2018.pdf.

It is a joint work with David F. Anderson (University of Tennessee).

A ring is a mathematical structure where you can add, subtract, and multiply, but not necessarily divide (think of the integers). A zero-divisor is an element in a ring that multiplies to another element to give you 0. Zero-divisors do not have a lot of structure, so we place them in a graph and see what the graphical structure can tell us about the ring structure. This paper furthers that endeavor by looking at a new class of rings.

Azarian delivers keynote address at international conference

Mohammad K. Azarian University of Evansville professor of mathematics, recently delivered the opening of the conference keynote address at the International Conference on Architecture and Mathematics in the ancient city of Kashan in Iran.

His keynote address was entitled, "An Overview of Mathematical Contributions of Ghiyath al-Din Jamshid Kashani."

Also, Azarian chaired two discussion panels. The first panel examined: (i) The Astronomical Observatories' Architecture Throughout the Ages, (ii) From Music to Mathematics in Regulating Waves and Space, and (iii) Golden Sections in Paintings-Is it There and Where to find it. The second panel discussed: (i) Metric and Topological Spaces and Architectural Geometry, and (ii) Proportion in Persian-Islamic Architecture.

Moreover, he agreed to serve on the editorial board of The Mathematics Interdisciplinary Research, a journal published by University of Kashan.

Clark Kimberling publishes research

University of Evansville professor of mathematics Clark Kimberling and English engineer Peter J. C. Moses have an article, "Nested Interval Sequences of Positive Real Numbers," in the current issue of the online mathematics Journal INTEGERS.

The article introduces a new kind of infinite series analogous to Engel series, with surprising connections to Egyptian fractions, hypergeometric functions, Bessel numbers, and Chebyshev polynomials.

Xiao has paper published in Neurocomputing

Pengcheng Xiao, University of Evansville assistant professor of mathematics, has had a paper published in Neurocomputing titled "Manifold NMF with L21 norm for clustering." It proposes a robust manifold nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) algorithm based on L21 norm, and the projected gradient method is utilized to obtain the updating rules

Professor Clark Kimberling has research published

University of Evansville professor of mathematics Clark Kimberling is co-author, with Christian Ballot (France) and Peter Moses (England), of "Linear Recurrences Originating from Polynomial Trees," in the Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Fibonacci Numbers and Their Applications.

The conference was held at the University of Caen in Caen, France, during June and July, 2016. Kimberling also led the Problem Proposals session, including twelve research proposals by mathematicians who attended the conference.

Azarian publishes review of math research paper in Mathematical Reviews

Mohammad K. Azarian, professor of mathematics, has published a review of a research paper in the American Mathematical Society's Mathematical Reviews (MathSciNet), the most respected data base for research in mathematical sciences

The paper reviewed appeared in Math. Slovaca 66 (2016) and is titled, "On Some Combinations of Terms of a Recurrence Sequence," and was authored by Lyes Ait-Amrane, Hacène Belbachir, and Kamel Betina. The authors present some identities satisfied by classical Morgan-Voyce sequence, and they study the periods of this sequence modulo an integer greater than 1. Also, they seek to determine which features of the Morgan-Voyce sequence remain true when it is generalized to elliptic curves defined over a finite field

Xiao has article published in Science China Technological Sciences

University of Evansville assistant professor of mathematics Pengcheng Xiao has had an article published in Science China Technological Sciences.

The article is entitled "Seizures dynamics in a neural field model of cortical-thalamic circuitry," and is part of his ongoing collaboration with Professor Honghui Zhang in China.

You can read the article online.

Mathematics professor publishes article in "Pattern Recognition Letters"

Pengcheng Xiao, assistant professor of mathematics, has published one research paper in Pattern Recognition Letters with his collaborators. The paper is titled” A new image classification method based on modified condensed nearest neighbor and convolutional neural networks.” You can read the article on the Science Direct website.

UE student Adam Lonnberg receives SIAM Recognition

University of Evansville student Adam Lonnberg recently received a 2017 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) Student Chapter Certificate of Recognition. Lonnberg is majoring in mathematics at UE.

The certificate is given in recognition of the recipient’s hard work and outstanding service and contributions to his or her SIAM student chapter. The names of students receiving the certificates of recognition will be announced in SIAM News and will be posted on the SIAM web site.

Lonnberg presents research at AMS Sectional Meeting

UE math student Adam Lonnberg recently delivered a contributed research talk at the 2017 American Mathematics Society Central Meeting at Indiana University, Bloomington. The talk was titled as “A Modeling Study of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) Axis Including Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR).”

Lonneberg's work was supported by UExplore Undergraduate Research Grant, Department of Mathematics, and Department of Chemistry. Pengcheng Xiao, assistant professor of mathematics, is the supervisor of this research project.

UE professor Mohammad Azarian receives Mathematical Association of America-Indiana Award

University of Evansville professor of mathematics Mohammad K. Azarian has received the 2017 Mathematical Association of America-Indiana section Distinguished Service Award.

This award honors a member of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) by "acknowledging his or her extraordinary contributions and outstanding efforts consistent with the stated purposes of the MAA."

Azarian was honored at the annual spring sectional meeting at Earlham College on March 24.

Azarian served on the Executive Board of the Indiana Section of the MAA from 2001-2007, during which he was responsible for the Indiana College Mathematics Competition each year, and coordinated all other student activities. He also serves as a referee for the Problems Section of The College Mathematics Journal, published by the MAA.

Since 1985, Azarian has presented 33 papers at MAA meetings and the joint annual meetings of MAA and the American Mathematical Society. Additionally, he has published 13 problems in The College Mathematics Journal, as well as three problems in Math Horizons, another popular mathematics journal of the MAA.

Mathematics professor lectures in Canada

Clark Kimberling, University of Evansville professor of mathematics, presented his recent research on "Beatty Sequences" and "Fractal Sequences, Fractal Trees, and Linear Recurrence Sequences" on March 8 and 9 to the Undergraduate Honours Seminar and the Faculty Colloquium at Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Beatty sequences are named in honor of Canadian number-theorist Sam Beatty, and fractal ltrees were introduced in 2016 in the Online Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences.

Azarian publishes reviews of mathematics research papers in MathSciNet

Mohammad K. Azarian, professor of mathematics, has published reviews of two research papers in the MathSciNet, the most respected data base for research in mathematical sciences.

The first paper, by Pavel Trojovský entitled, "On Some Combinations of Terms of a Recurrence Sequence," published in Chaos Solitons Fractals. This paper examines integer linear homogeneous recurrence sequences, in connection with k-Nacci sequence, Lucas sequence, and repdigits. The second paper, by Vinícius Facó and Diego Marques, entitled, "Tribonacci Numbers and the Brocard-Ramanujan Equation", appeared in the Journal of Integer Sequences. This paper deals with Diophantine equations involving factorials. Authors have been motivated by the work of Goldbach, D. Bernoulli, J. Liouvill, Ramanujan, and Erdo"s. The movie, "The Man Who Knew Infinity" is based on Ramanujan's highly exceptional mathematical legacy.

Xiao Coauthors Article Published in Cognitive Neurodynamics

Assistant professor of mathematics Pengcheng Xiao has co-authored an article that has just been published in the journal Cognitive Neurodynamics. The article is titled "Dynamics of in-phase and anti-phase bursting in the coupled pre-Bötzinger complex cells."

Contact the author for a copy at px3@evansville.edu or go here to read it.

Clark Kimberling presents paper at mathematics meeting in France

In July, University of Evansville professor of mathematics Clark Kimberling attended the 17th International Conference on Fibonacci Numbers and Their Applications at the University of Caen, in Caen, France. Kimberling chaired two sessions and presented research conducted during the past year with British engineer Peter Moses. The title was "Polynomial Trees and Subtrees."

As editor for the problem proposals section of the conference proceedings, Kimberling is preparing a chapter based on 14 problems which were unsolved at the time that various mathematicians presented them at the conference.

Article in mathematical probability theory published

Clark Kimberling, professor of mathematics, has an article entitled "A directory of families of infinitely extendible Archimedean copulas" in the journal Fuzzy Sets and Systems. The article introduces new copulas, which are ways of combining single probability distributions to form multivariate joint distribution

Department of Mathematics at UE Announces New Statistics and Data Science Program

Instructor and studentsThe Department of Mathematics at the University of Evansville has announced the creation of a degree program in Statistics and Data Science. Students in the program will apply statistical and computational techniques to convert vast amounts of data into actionable insights that drive decision making. Students may enroll now, and classes are set to begin in the fall of 2016.

The digital revolution has created vast amounts of data. Extracting meaning from this avalanche of information is the goal of data science, a rapidly growing field that is revolutionizing marketing, education, and sports, as well as scientific fields such as genomics, neuroscience, and particle physics.  

There is currently a global data scientist talent gap. It is estimated that by 2018, there will be twice as many data scientist jobs as there are data scientists.

“Individuals with education and experience in data science are in high demand,” says Shane Davidson, vice president for enrollment services at UE. “Right now, the average salary for a data scientist is $118,000.”

Extracting meaning from data requires not only quantitative skills such as mathematics, statistics and computer programming, but also experience in working with real-world data.

“The curriculum for the new program is grounded in classical statistical techniques while incorporating cutting-edge techniques and tools for dealing with Big Data,” says Dave Dwyer, chair of the mathematics department at UE.  “The courses are all project-driven, so students gain experience in working with real-world data not only through their internship experiences, but also through their course work.”

For more information or to enroll in the Statistics and Data Sciences program at the University of Evansville, contact the Office of Admission at 812-488-2468 or visit www.evansville.edu/majors/math/dataScience.cfm.

Mathematics Article Published

Clark Kimberling, Professor of Mathematics, has a research article in the current issue of theINTEGERS: The Electronic Journal of Combinatorial Number Theory.

 Entitled "Beatty Sequences and Trigonometric Functions," the article proves some newly discovered relations between complementary integer sequences on one hand and the sine and tangent functions on the other. To access the journal and scroll to the article, click here: http://www.integers-ejcnt.org/vol16.html.

Research Published in American Mathematical Monthly

Clark Kimberling, University of Evansville professor of mathematics, and Kenneth Stolarsky, professor emeritus of mathematics at the University of Illinois, have an article in the American Mathematical Monthly.

Entitled "Slow Beatty Sequences, Devious Convergence, and Partitional Divergence," the article introduces the term "devious convergence" for any sequence (x_n) that converges to a number L so slowly that for every huge number B, there is some L' other than L such that x_n = L' for more than B numbers n.

The article then introduces the term "partitional divergence." Examples of limiting behavior for both types are drawn from Beatty sequences.

Research published in American Mathematical Monthly

Clark Kimberling, professor of mathematics at UE, and Kenneth Stolarsky, professor emeritus of mathematics at the University of Illinois, have an article in the American Mathematical Monthly, titled "Slow Beatty Sequences, Devious Convergence, and Partitional Divergence."

The article introduces the term "devious convergence" for any sequence (x_n) that converges to a number L so slowly that for every huge number B, there is some L' other than L such that x_n = L' for more than B numbers n. The article then introduces the term "partitional divergence." Examples of limiting behavior for both types are drawn from Beatty sequences.

By courtesy of the Mathematical Association of America, the article can be downloaded here.

Mohammad K. Azarian Invited to Contribute to Encyclopedia of Islam

Mohammad K. Azarian, professor of mathematics, has been invited to write an article about Nizam al-Din Abd al-Ali ibn Muhammad ibn Husain al-Birjandi (known as Abd al-Ali Birjandi) and his contributions to the advancement of medieval mathematics and astronomy. The article will be published in the third edition of the Encyclopedia of Islam.

Birjandi was a renowned 16th century Persian astronomer, mathematician, physicist, and logician: a polymath genius.

At a special session (by invitation) of the joint annual meetings of the American Mathematical Society and Mathematical Association of American in January, Azarian presented a paper about Birjandi and his legacy.

The editor of Azarian’s article will be Emilie Savage-Smith, professor of the history of Islamic sciences at University of Oxford, and like the previous two editions, this third edition will be published by Brill Academic Publishers.

Mathematics Article Published

Clark Kimberling, professor of mathematics, and László Szalay, a professor at the University of West Hungary, have a research article in the current issue of The Fibonacci Quarterly. Entitled, "t-sion of Two Polynomial Sequences and Factorization Properties," the work derives explicit formulas for generalized fusion and fission polynomials. Click here to download an abstract.

UE Professors Awarded Grant for Science, Math Scholarships

University of Evansville faculty members Joyce Stamm, associate professor of biology, and Adam Salminen, associate professor of mathematics, have secured a five-year, $610,600 grant through the National Science Foundation’s S-STEM (Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) program to assist students in science and mathematics. The grant is one of about 90 awarded from the 436 proposals submitted to the S-STEM program, and is the largest faculty grant in school history.

The award provides funds for financial, academic, and professional support for students majoring in the sciences and mathematics. The majority of the grant, around $528,000, will fund the new UE Science and Math Scholarship (SAMS), which will provide four-year scholarships to approximately 34 academically talented students with financial need who are majoring in biochemistry, biology, chemistry, environmental science, mathematics, or physics.

The grant also provides funds for new support services for science and mathematics majors at UE. These services include an introductory summer course for incoming students, a semester-long course on study skills and time management, monthly career colloquiums, and a science and math-themed living-learning community in a campus residence hall. These activities will be available to all math and science students at UE and will continue after the grant ends in 2018.

“This grant not only represents an incredible opportunity to transform the lives of future students at the University of Evansville, but the National Science Foundation’s decision to fund the proposal also demonstrates the University’s outstanding track record of preparing students to succeed in math and science careers and graduate programs,” said John Mosbo, UE senior vice president for academic affairs. “At UE, students receive a personalized education that equips them to make an impact on the national shortfall of qualified STEM professionals. Dr. Salminen and Dr. Stamm’s successful grant application affirms that commitment to teaching.”

“Thanks to this grant, we’ll be able to help an even greater number of high-achieving students pursue an education at the University of Evansville,” said Salminen. “We expect that the SAMS scholarship will increase enrollment of students majoring in math and the sciences.”

“The new student success initiatives will also help ease students’ transitions from high school to college, and from college to graduate school or the workforce,” Stamm added. “We believe this level of personal support will increase retention of students in math and science majors, and ultimately increase the number of qualified professionals in the STEM workforce.”

SAMS scholarships will be available starting with UE’s entering freshman class of 2014. For selection criteria and application details, interested students may visit the program website.

UE Professors Awarded Grant for Science, Math Scholarships

UE Names 2013 Berger Award Winners

David Dwyer, Mark Gruenwald, and Jean Beckman have been named the winners of the 2013 Sydney and Sadelle Berger Awards, presented each year to members of the University of Evansville faculty who demonstrate exceptional scholarly activity and service.

Dwyer, chair of the Department of Mathematics and a professor of mathematics, and Gruenwald, also a professor of mathematics, jointly received the award for scholarship. Beckman, a professor of chemistry, earned the award for service. UE President Tom Kazee presented both awards today at the University’s annual Fall Conference for faculty and administrators.

As a team, Dwyer and Gruenwald have made a profound impact on their academic discipline nationwide. They recently received a highly competitive $600,000 grant from the National Science Foundation that will allow them to broaden and continue their Resequencing Calculus project, which builds on work funded by a previous NSF grant in 2009. 

For this project, Dwyer and Gruenwald revised the standard three-semester calculus sequence to better meet the needs of students in a variety of STEM disciplines. They also wrote a 700-page textbook to support the first two semesters of this sequence, piloted the sequence at UE, and identified supporters of the redesigned sequence at other institutions.

Dwyer and Gruenwald, both of whom have won the Dean’s Teaching Award for UE’s College of Arts and Sciences, have also sold more than 30,000 copies of five commercially published mathematics textbooks.

Beckman, who won the award for service, came to the University of Evansville 35 years ago. Since then, she has become widely respected on campus for her fairness, her selfless dedication to the University, and her passion and commitment to teaching.

Beckman chaired the Department of Chemistry from 1989 to 2003. Although her first love is teaching, she has also served the University in numerous administrative roles over the years, including terms as dean and interim dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and interim vice president for academic affairs.

Beckman has served on countless University committees: search committees, numerous Faculty Senate committees, the General Education Revision Subcommittee, the Writing Subcommittee, the Honorary Degree Committee, and the UE United Way Campaign Committee, just to name a few. 

The Berger Awards are presented annually in memory of Sadelle and Sydney Berger. Sadelle was a UE graduate and lifelong member of the Academy of Arts and Sciences at UE, while Sydney was a well-known local attorney. Both dedicated their lives to public service. The Berger family established the endowment to give recognition to faculty at the University of Evansville.

UE Math Professors Awarded $600,000 National Science Foundation Grant

Dave Dwyer and Mark Gruenwald, professors of mathematics at the University of Evansville, have been awarded a three-year, $600,000 grant from the National Science Foundation.

The grant is one of 30 awarded out of over 400 proposals submitted to the NSF’s TUES program (Transforming Undergraduate Education in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) for extending and broadening the work of successful pilot projects related to undergraduate STEM education. It is one of only two such grants awarded for projects related to mathematics.

“This grant is not just a tremendous honor for Dr. Dwyer, Dr. Gruenwald, and the Department of Mathematics, but it is also a wonderful example of the quality of the faculty at the University of Evansville,” said UE President Thomas A. Kazee. “Their project has the potential to revolutionize the way calculus is taught across the nation. By funding this grant, the National Science Foundation affirms the remarkable commitment Professor Dwyer and Professor Gruenwald have made to scholarship and teaching.”

The grant supports the second phase of Dwyer and Gruenwald’s Resequencing Calculus project, which builds on work that was funded by a $150,000 NSF grant awarded in 2009. Under the first grant, Dwyer and Gruenwald revised the standard three-semester calculus sequence to better meet the emerging needs of students in a variety of STEM disciplines, wrote a 700-page textbook to support the first two semesters of this sequence, piloted the sequence at UE, and identified supporters of the redesigned sequence at other institutions.

Phase 2 of the project entails completing the three-semester textbook, testing and assessing the textbook and the sequence at four other universities (Valparaiso University, Millikin University, the University of Central Missouri, and the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota), and campaigning for broad and sustained adoption of the revised sequence.

“A close look at the order and choice of topics in the mainstream calculus sequence is long overdue, especially in light of the ever-increasing role of mathematical and statistical modeling in fields such as chemistry, biology, and economics,” said Dwyer. “For too many students and at too many institutions, mainstream calculus sequences as they exist now are a poor fit.”

According to biochemist Kristy Miller, chair of UE’s Department of Chemistry, “Students in chemistry and the life sciences would benefit from exposure to certain topics that are usually not covered until the third semester of calculus, but most of these students do not have room in their schedules for a full three-semester sequence.”

“One of the goals of the Resequencing Calculus project is to rearrange the ordering and choice of topics in the mainstream calculus sequence to better fit the needs of today’s students,” Gruenwald added. “Our approach more closely connects calculus instruction with its application in STEM fields, and it facilitates deeper and earlier exposure to both upper-level math courses and upper-level courses in STEM disciplines where calculus is applied.”

A number of UE faculty members will serve in an advisory capacity to the project, including Mohammad Azarian, Erin Davis, Clark Kimberling, and Adam Salminen in the Department of Mathematics; Jeff Braun in the Department of Physics; and David Unger in the Department of Mechanical and Civil Engineering. Brian Ernsting, assistant dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, will serve as an internal assessment advisor. Teams of undergraduate math majors at UE will contribute to the development of the text and related materials.

Dwyer and Gruenwald will also be assisted by faculty and students at each of the pilot institutions, an external professional assessment team, and an advisory board consisting of national leaders in various STEM professional organizations.

To learn more about this project, please visit the Resequencing Calculus website.

Office Phone:
812-488-1234

Office Email:
math@evansville.edu

Office Location:
Room 314, Koch Center for Engineering and Science